BMW Linked Brakes

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BMW Linked Brakes

Postby mczink » Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:40 pm

I have a question about how the linked brakes work on my R1150RS (2003). I know that when I press the rear brakes, just the rear brakes operate, but when I press the front brakes, the rear brake calipers also press in. But I would like more details. For example, with the Honda linked braking system, when the front brakes are pressed, only the center caliper of the rear brakes operates. Only when both front and rear brakes are pressed do you get the full braking effect. Also, when you press the front brake, the rear brake kicks in just ahead of the front. Is it the same on the BMW?

I took an ERC a couple of weeks ago and the instructors really couldn't help me understand how their braking instructions might need to be modified if you have the BMW linked braking system. They just went with the party line - always press with both brakes together. But I want to know more.

Thanks anyone,

Chris Zink
mczink
 

Not positive, but

Postby prtdvl » Fri Jun 20, 2003 10:25 am

The way it was told to me, is that if you only depress one brake, both will engage, but the one you press will be applied with the most force- I have an LT, and this is horrible for low-speed maneuvering, but great when you're going 60mph, and someone pulls out in front of you.
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Postby philspace » Mon Jun 23, 2003 11:41 am

I was told by the BMW guys that every time you fire the bike up the system determines the proper ratio between the front and rear brakes based upon the first three times you use the brakes (after starting the engine). Supposedly this will compensate for extra weight from riding two up or camping gear.

BMW doesn't selectively engage only one cylinder on a caliper they way Honda did. It is actually two separate control and two separate brake circuits that run to and from the ABS controller to the controls and calipers - completely different than what Honda used to do.
Phil Space
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Phil's right

Postby WVrider » Sun Jul 06, 2003 9:13 am

ABSIII brakes are power assisted and, like car ABS, automaticaaly proportion the brake force. Better than an arbitrary fixed mechacical ratio.

Earlier ABS were only oriented for each separate wheel and then you have to apply both brakes.

WVrider
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Re: BMW Linked Brakes

Postby Guest » Tue Jul 22, 2003 8:03 am

mczink wrote:I have a question about how the linked brakes work on my R1150RS (2003). I know that when I press the rear brakes, just the rear brakes operate, but when I press the front brakes, the rear brake calipers also press in. But I would like more details. For example, with the Honda linked braking system, when the front brakes are pressed, only the center caliper of the rear brakes operates. Only when both front and rear brakes are pressed do you get the full braking effect. Also, when you press the front brake, the rear brake kicks in just ahead of the front. Is it the same on the BMW?

I took an ERC a couple of weeks ago and the instructors really couldn't help me understand how their braking instructions might need to be modified if you have the BMW linked braking system. They just went with the party line - always press with both brakes together. But I want to know more.

Thanks anyone,

Chris Zink


dear chris, to understand more about the BMW Evo brakes, i have found an article from motorcycle online for you.........
http://www.motorcycle.com/mo/mcbmw/02r1150.motml

hope that helps.
safe riding, asia, Singapore rider.
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Postby mczink » Thu Aug 14, 2003 11:43 am

Thanks for the URL! It perfectly answered my question.

I was a little disappointed at the Experienced Rider Course I took with other BMW riders when the instructors couldn't answer my question as to what differences in braking techniques might be required or might be used to take maximum advantage of the BMW partially linked ABS brakes. They just reiterated the party line that you should use both brakes at all times. Surely if that were the case, then BMW wouldn't have made partially linked brakes.

Any comments anyone?

Chris Zink
mczink
 

Postby Guest » Thu Aug 21, 2003 8:41 am

[quote="mczink"]Thanks for the URL! It perfectly answered my question.

I was a little disappointed at the Experienced Rider Course I took with other BMW riders when the instructors couldn't answer my question as to what differences in braking techniques might be required or might be used to take maximum advantage of the BMW partially linked ABS brakes. They just reiterated the party line that you should use both brakes at all times. Surely if that were the case, then BMW wouldn't have made partially linked brakes.

Any comments anyone?

well chris i do not know what the bmw instructors told you..... but for my experince and knowledge, anyway i am not a professional racer or ridier but i would like to share my knowledge with you....

for the conventional braking without EVO or ABS, which i learnt in my riding school, where i got my licence,... the front brake provides more braking power that the rear brake. i did a "figure of 8" course in one of the programs of my riding lessons, and i was instructed to use only the rear braking in control the speed of my bike and the to use the front cos i would skid. BUT..... NEVER NEVER use the rear brake when you are cornering a corner on raining day, cos i did that years ago, and based on what i learnt from riding school..... result: i skidded and fell!

so for the EVO brake, the front controls the both front and rear while the rear control only the rear. i would say if you do a U-turn, you do not need to apply the front of your bike but just tapping your rear on and off to control your speed. and in general braking, in straight, apply both brakes. cos when in panic situations, one would grasps the front brake, base on instinct and that is where the EVO brake comes in, a fool proof brake they called. as for cornering, as a non pro view, i would brake before i negotiate a corner which is braking a little before my front wheel turns. and make use of the BMW R-engine braking. you be surprised you do not even need to apply brake or just a little braking is all you need.

well, that is all i can tell you and i hope it helps. generally you need to clock more riding time and you will be used to your bike! and more riding time not only for long trips but also streets and city to getused to braking and handling.

asian singapore rider
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