Fuse Panel Options

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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby eap » Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:26 am

henwin wrote:
eap wrote:...SNIP...
First things first, I think this is the link...'SNIP...FIXED THE LINK you meant for the one you accidentally put in above.

Second, I think that the PDM at $200 is WAY overkill for what you are looking for. It's got those nice LEDs, but who's ever going to see them? They'll be under the seat!

If you do a Google search on "fuse panels for motorcycles" you will come up with a bunch of leads for units that are mostly less expensive than the PDM cited above.


Be sure to read the reviews of the unit mentioned above. There is very disheartening info there which may cause you to think about a different fuse block than the PowerHub2.

...SNIP...
A couple of comments: You can run your heated gear from one of the Powerlet connectors provided you have the proper sized fuse. For example, most heated jacket liners attached to a pair of heated gloves draw between 10 and 14A, therefore a 15A fuse on that circuit should be enough. If you buy a BMW male connector and connect your heated gear wires to it, you can connect your heated dear directly to the PowerLet connector. I do it. It works great, and is very easy to disconnect.

You only need 1 Powerlet connection from which to use your battery charger, and that connection has to be wired "always hot", so you don't need the electrical system "on" when recharging your battery. You can connect your heated gear to the hot Powerlet connector and kill 2 birds with one stone.

...SNIP...


Thanks Henry,
Link is fixed and I have plenty of options for my heated gear (2 Powerlets and a pigtail...) so I am ok there and sent a note off to Powerlet about the jump starting throught the unit - they sell a specific product for that, but I also thought that Bob's built a customer jumper cable for this purpose that uses the aux Powerlet socket... (?)

My imediate concern is about tidying up the bulky connections at the battery terminal - but who know if I will install a Stebel or more lights or something down the road, so additional capacity is a plus.

My second concern and which draws me to the PDM60 and Twisted Throttles Denali is water resistance (also low profile and I like DENALI's integrated micro relay). The Centech and others mentioned in this thread appear to be pretty open to water intrusion and I have had water and electrical issues (though not to a fuse block) in the past -call me paranoid.

I am aware of one contradictory comment regarding the DENALI on Twisted Throttle review site - the user praises the unit, then complained that he could not source the proper sized mini-fuses ...
Rating
Easy to install and keeps electrical connections organized and visible if there is an issue. A great addition if you are adding multiple connections. (Posted on 9/5/13)
Review by Kyle
Rating
The design and construction quality of the fuse block are generally very good, with one exception. The standard mini fuses that you have laying around for your bikes are a bit too tall to fit in the box properly. This causes the lid to be unseated when you fill the fuse slots, although the rubber holders will still keep it in place. For the price I would expect better, as a single product test would have revealed this issue. I do not know where to source any smaller fuses to avoid the issue. (Posted on 8/31/13)
I will check on this but TT sells packets of fuses but if you found something more, i'd be interested...

So, along with low profile I guess it comes down to water resistance as my main desirable factor/concern in a fuse block ... Am I overly paranoid?
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby eap » Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:22 pm

lionlady wrote:This Blue Sea Fuse block is nice and small: Part #5028 - without negative bus
Image

And here are the specs:
Maximum Amperage Per Circuit: 30 Amperes
ATO®/ATC® Fuses Available: 1 to 30 Amperes
Maximum Amperage per Block: 100 Amperes
Maximum Voltage Rating: 32 Volts DC

Or there's this one: Part #5025 (I've got this one on my Rockster - bought it at West Marine, in Glen Burnie):
Image
with specs:
ATO®/ATC® Fuses Available: 1 to 30 Amperes
Maximum Amperage Per Circuit: 30 Amperes
Maximum Amperage per Block: 100 Amperes
Maximum Voltage Rating: 32 Volts DC


LL or GuitarDad or someone - I think this is the Blue Seas 5025 you mention - what are the dimensions of these units? What size relay is needed?

Image
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby radon222 » Mon Feb 10, 2014 1:50 pm

Hey Ed,

West Marine usually carries the Blue Seas products in stock. Are there any Westies in your part of the state?
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby eap » Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:38 pm

radon222 wrote:Hey Ed,

West Marine usually carries the Blue Seas products in stock. Are there any Westies in your part of the state?

Yep - website says there's one on Randolph Rd, Rockville - I'll check to see if there is a Starbucks :) nearby and go check it out in the new future... but it looks like a dangerous place with farkly things...
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby Genen8kua » Tue Feb 11, 2014 1:32 am

For your relay, make sure the current rating of the relay is greater than or equal to the total amount of current you expect the fuse block to carry and place an inline fuse in the circuit between the battery and the relay. You can energize the relay a number of ways - the advantage of the twisted throttle device is that it's easy and is a readily reversible and almost plug and play operation into the parking light (assuming the parking light on your new GS is the same as on the older ones). Alternately, simply adding a diode to the relay coil circuit will protect the CAN bus system (which probably has its own overvoltage protection anyway). I found this nice write-up about relayshttp://www.bcae1.com/relays.htm that is written with car audio in mind, but easily applies to other applications. There's a nice calculator at the bottom too.

Nice tinned marine-grade wire is a good idea too.

It turns out I have an extra one of the parking light/diode connectors: I just purchased a light bar for my 2007 1200GS and one was included. Since I already have one installed, this one is surplus. But you could go to Radio Shack and get a handful of 1N400x diodes for under $5 & the posi-taps are pretty good ways to tap into whatever you choose to energize the relay.

The real PITA with any project like this is sourcing the bits in small quantities and having the tools and supplies (a good crimper, a soldering iron, heat shrink tubing, etc.). The pre-assembled wiring kits from Eastern Beaver and the like start looking better from that perspective even though it's hard to spend the money.

I really like the PDM-60 - sealed, solid state, etc., but can't bring myself to spend the extra cash, especially in comparison to even the more expensive of the other options.
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby lionlady » Sat Feb 22, 2014 10:40 pm

eap wrote:
lionlady wrote:This Blue Sea Fuse block is nice and small: Part #5028 - without negative bus

LL or GuitarDad or someone - I think this is the Blue Seas 5025 you mention - what are the dimensions of these units? What size relay is needed?

Image


Just spotted this post. That looks like the fuse block in my bike. Size About the dimensions of a pack of extra long cigarettes, (but thicker). I'll page Chaz for the relay info, and he can provide exact measurements as well.

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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby Chiba » Sat Feb 22, 2014 11:53 pm

FWIW, I watched a hardened LD rider that's soon to embark on a RTW journey installing a fuse panel - Centech AP2 was his choice.
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Re: Fuse Panel Options

Postby guitardad » Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:09 pm

eap wrote:LL or GuitarDad or someone - I think this is the Blue Seas 5025 you mention - what are the dimensions of these units? What size relay is needed?

Image


Yep, that's it. Dimensions are 4-7/8 long x 3-1/4 wide x 1-1/2 high. If it's in a fairly protected area, like under the seat, I'd be willing to run it without the lid. But that only saves about a quarter-inch from the height.

On Pam's Rockster, I installed it with a 60-amp relay from Digikey. The rating of the relay is really based on all the loads you're driving and the wiring to them, rather than the fuse block. Remember, the purpose of the fuse isn't to protect your lights or your GPS - it's to cut off the huge currents that would result if one of those loads shorts out, which would overheat the wires going to the load and catch your bike on fire. :shock: I picked that relay because we had 110 watts of lights (2 55-watt halogens) and 100 watts of heated gear (jacket liner + gloves), plus a bunch of smaller loads. All told, that's 25 amps or more of load thru the fuse box, with those two circuits alone being about 10 amps. My rule of thumb for current ratings is to be at least 2x the manufacturer's rating, so I needed at least a 50A relay. 60A was the next standard size up.

Nice thing nowadays is how many choices there are for low-current lights - HIDs and LEDs. With that reduction in the load, a less robust fuse block and relay are perfectly fine.
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